Tag Archives: Sparks Architects

Pavilions by Sparks Architects

Pavilions is a project designed by Sparks Architects. Dividing the plan into two ‘pavilions’ linked by a generous breezeway space enables natural light and ventilation into the south, as well as north, parts of the house. This also provides a simple circulation area between the various rooms, and levels. Living areas are on the upper floor which enjoys views over the dunes to the ocean; the bedrooms and library are located on the more private and protected ground floor which is tucked in behind the dunal vegetation. Photography by Christopher Frederick Jones.

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Tent House by Sparks Architects

Tent House by Sparks Architects. This forest clearing addressing a pocket of rainforest in the Noosa hinterland, is approached through a typical neighbourhood of rural houses and acreage dwellings. The journey to the house continues from the street via a winding bush track through the forest which acts as a threshold between the constructed world and that of the clearing, a place remnant of early settlement in the region; a camp. Photography by Christopher Frederick Jones.

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Valley House by Sparks Architects

Valley House is a project designed by Sparks Architects. The dramatic topography, bush setting of the Obi Obi Valley and Kondalilla Falls; and diverse climatic conditions of the hinterland were the driving forces for this design. Photography by Christopher Frederick Jones.

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Pandanus by Sparks Architects

Pandanus is a project designed by Sparks Architects. On an enviable site directly opposite the dunes of Peregian Beach, the challenge for this project was to get high enough to capture the sea views over the dunes without exceeding the statutory height limits or blocking all of the neighbour’s views. In fact, the finished building sits well below the maximum height allowed on the sloping block with the bulk of the building running back along the depth of the site, while the portion of the building across the width of the site sits on a minimum of structure to create an open terrace underneath. Photography by Christopher Frederick Jones.

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