Becherer by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA Architect

Becherer by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA Architect. Rolling pastures, bordered with dark stained fences interspersed in woodlands, define the Albemarle County, Virginia countryside, where this project is located. The new house is sited at the edge of woodland and on the crest of a hill, providing vantage view points of the pastures and distant treetops.

Becherer by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA  Architect 01

Becherer by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA  Architect 02 Becherer by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA  Architect 03 Becherer by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA  Architect 04 Becherer by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA  Architect 05 Becherer by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA  Architect 06 Becherer by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA  Architect 07 Becherer by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA  Architect 08 Becherer by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA  Architect 09 Becherer by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA  Architect 10 Becherer by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA  Architect 11 Becherer by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA  Architect 12 Becherer by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA  Architect 13 Becherer by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA  Architect 14 Becherer by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA  Architect 15 Becherer by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA  Architect 16 Becherer by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA  Architect 17 Becherer by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA  Architect 18 Becherer by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA  Architect 19 Becherer by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA  Architect 20 Becherer by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA  Architect 21

The house is conceived as three gable-roofed pavilions that provide a threshold between the woodlands and the pastures, taking advantage of two very different scenic panoramas. The one-room deep, central living pavilion contains large expanses of glass along two walls, affording views of both the woods and rolling horse pastures. This configuration insures that the space will be flooded with light at all times of the day throughout the year. A screened porch and bluestone terrace, running the length of the house, provides a stage to view sunsets over the pastures, while a manicured lawn and dry-stacked slate wall provides an ordered transition from the house to the woods beyond.
Gable roofs with black standing seam metal, clapboard siding, and the small scale of the separated pavilions evoke a familiar and comfortable rural vernacular, while the large expanses of glass, cement board paneling and crisp, minimal detailing render the house decidedly modern.
Photographer: Maxwell MacKenzie Architectural Photographer